how to make your phone cords last a long time

how to make your phone cords last a long time

While we make money when people need new phone cords, we're not greedy. We're perfectly willing to share some tips that will help you get more life out of your phone cords.
  • Believe it or not, some telephone cords are still working fine at age 65 -- but others don't make it to their first birthday.
  • The longer a phone cord is, the more likely it is to get twisted-up, rolled over by a chair, chewed up by a pet, burnt by a stove, caught in a drawer, or meet some other form of premature death. Don't get anything longer than you need. If you use a phone at your desk, a normal 6-footer should be fine.
  • Lots of people complain that their cords twist up. Well folks, here's the truth: cords don't twist themselves; people twist them.
  • If your cord gets twisted, un-twist it. If you have a really long cord, the best way to untwist it, is to hang it out a window and let gravity help you.
  • Sometimes a cord gets several small twists, where the cord reverses direction. An easy way to fix this is to wrap the cord around a dowel, a stick, a narrow pipe, a broom handle, a toilet plunger, etc., and fix each reversal one at a time.
  • Prevention is better than the cure. If you don't let your cords get twisted, you won't have to untwist them.
  • You can buy cord un-twisters. Some of them are junk that cause static and fall apart in a few months. We have good ones with lifetime guarantees.
  • Some people twist their handset cords until they become a solidified mass and finally break. The hyper-twisting of the coil is usually caused by rotating the handset when switching it from one ear to the other, and then in the same direction when switching back again. Be conscious of what you're doing, and try to rotate your handset in the opposite direction when switching back to the original ear. If you rotate the handset clockwise when switching from left ear to right ear, rotate it counter-clockwise when switching from right ear to left ear. Try it a few times until it becomes natural and automatic. Teach your children, unless they always use a cellphone or cordless.
  • Don't run over your phone cord with the wheels of your desk chair. Try to re-route the cord away from the path of the chair (get a longer cord if necessary). If the cord has to cross a traffic pathway, protect it with FlexiDuct or other suitable wire covering.
  • Don't stretch your handset cord out to its maximum length. That will put a lot of pressure on the junction between the cord and the plug, and they might separate and you'll have a useless cord.
  • Copy and paste this into an email and send it to all of your staff, or print it and post it where everyone will see it.